Jerusalem’s Ethiopians

There are around 160,500 citizens of Ethiopian descent in Israel, having experienced quite a struggle to actually arrive here.

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Coastal Tel Aviv: Bat Yam’s Troubles

15,900 persons per sq.km live in Bat Yam and the total population is around 160,000, so it’s a relatively small city.  Soviet/Russian immigrants make up nearly 30 percent of the population.  It has been a city that has struggled over the years with poverty.

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Israel – Future Scenario

This is an aid center in Nof HaGalil, not far from the Sea of Galilee.  Along with the standard new and second-hand clothing, it contains shoes and household items. 

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Together, Let’s Help Israel’s Homeless

For the month of December, Israel Relief Aid will be reaching out to the poor at the Tel Aviv Homeless Café. 

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For Jerusalem

Israel Relief Aid got in an unusual item:  new soccer shoes (with the cleats under them for playing on grass)! 

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A Shuk in the Promised Land

In case you don’t know what a shuk is, it is an outdoor market where anyone can put up a table and sell their wares, farmers can sell produce from their fields, etc. 

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Ramle

Ramle is a mixed city of Middle Eastern Jews, Muslim Arabs, Christian Arabs, Ethiopian Jews and Russian Jews.    It’s not unusual to hear English, Arabic, Amharic, Russian and Hebrew at any given time. 

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November Project: To Jerusalem from Ethiopia

On March 11, 2021, 300 Beta Israel Ethiopians immigrated to Israel-the last of 2,000 from Operation Tzur Israel which began in December 2020.  Today, Israel is home to the largest Beta Israel community in the world, with about 160,500 citizens of Ethiopian descent.

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New Opportunity for Israel

In the Netherlands, this container is being loaded for Israel. Inside is new clothing and adult diapers. 

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Update on the Bethlehem Christians

Bethlehem lies around 6 miles south of Jerusalem.  Around 16% of its inhabitants are Christian Arabs.  It’s interesting that large numbers of these Christians originally migrated from Yemen and the Petra area to escape Muslim persecution, and yet now they find themselves again under Muslim rule.  Bethlehem also has its share of Christian Arabs in poverty and they deserve help.

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